2014-16 Strategic Plan
Department of Historic Resources [423]

The Department of Historic Resources (DHR) fosters, encourages, and supports the stewardship and use of Virginia’s significant architectural, archaeological, and historic resources as valuable assets for the economic, educational, social, and cultural benefit of citizens and communities.

 

We envision a future for Virginia where historic places are recognized and managed as valuable and irreplaceable economic, cultural, and educational assets for the benefit of individual property owners, and for the communities in which we live, play, and work--and where people recycle buildings as routinely as they recycle cans and glass. We also envision the Department of Historic Resources as a nationally recognized historic preservation and customer service agency that provides the tools and the leadership to inspire and assist property owners, developers, local governments and public agencies to ensure that Virginia’s historic buildings, districts, sites and other historic properties are appropriately considered in public and private decision-making and effectively preserved and used for the benefit of our communities today and for many generations to come.

 
  • Transparency
  • Integrity
  • Customer Service
  • Inclusiveness
 
Financial Overview

The Department of Historic Resources (DHR) carries out a variety of programs that encourage the preservation of Virginia’s historic resources. Preservation programs include (but are not limited to) the Virginia Landmarks Register, Review of State and Federal Projects, State and Federal Historic Rehabilitation Tax Credits, Easements, Historical Highway Markers and Archaeological programs. Also, DHR administers grants to non-state entities under the Financial Assistance for Historic and Commemorative Attractions and the Financial Assistance for Historic Preservation programs.

A former program of grants appropriated by the General Assembly to provide funding for State Grants to Nonstate Entities and grants for financial assistance for historic preservation has not been funded since FY2009 affecting two DHR service areas 14307 (non-historic grants) and 50204 (historic preservation grants).

DHR’s funding comes from general funds, federal grants, private gifts and donations, State Tax Act, archives research, curatorial fees. Other sources include sales and royalties from publications, copy machine fees, interest, and federal grant cost recoveries.

Biennial Budget
2015
General Fund
2015
Nongeneral Fund
2016
General Fund
2016
Nongeneral Fund
Initial Appropriation for the Biennium5,058,3422,316,7985,068,6532,316,901
Changes to Initial Appropriation-285,0670729,9960
(Changes to Initial Appropriation will be 0 when the plan is created. They will change when the plan is updated mid-biennium.)
 
Anticipated Changes to Customer Base

DHR's customer base includes individuals, agencies, and organizations that own or otherwise benefit from historic resources.  Stakeholders deal directly with DHR to register historic homes and commercial buildings and seek guidance and incentives to rehabilitate buildings, to conduct research on Virginia history or to support sound private and public decision-making,, or to use historic places to education both children and adult learners. They also include travelers and citizens who experience the economic, cultural and quality of life benefits of tourist attractions and livable historic communities. Demand for and reliance on DHR service from one customer group to another varies greatly depending on the nature of the service (e.g. educational materials vs technical assistance) and on changing economic situations of the customers/industry served. For example, as economic pressures affect both public and private construction, the numbers of projects on which DHR is consulted may go down, but the complexity of requests increases because the requesting organization or agency lacks experience and expertise. Overall, the numbers of customers tend to be relatively stable--but the service they require continues to grow. The numbers of historic property owners continues to grow as Virginia's building stock ages, as more and more historic properties are identified, and as more owners choose to place those properties under protective easements.  For example, in the past decade, the number of easements that DHR oversees has risen from roughly 200 to well over 500.

Current Customer List
Predefined GroupUser Defined GroupNumber Served AnnuallyPotential Number of Annual CustomersProjected Customer Trend
ConsumerGeneral public and tourist500,0008,300,000Stable
Higher Education InstitutionsScholars and researchers3002,000Stable
Local or Regional Government AuthoritiesLocal governments45300Increase
MinorityNative American tribes and other Native American groups1111Stable
Non-Profit Agency (Boards/Foundations),Historic attractions and museums60700Stable
Non-Profit Agency (Boards/Foundations),Non-profit organizations that purchase, conserve, and manage Civil War battlefield lands and easemen710Stable
OrganizationMemorial associations and other organizations caring for the graves of Confederate and Revolutionary War Veterans250250Stable
OrganizationPreservation organizations and professionals100600Stable
Property OwnerOwners of historic properties1,000100,000Increase
State Agency(s),State Agencies that own or impact historic resources5080Increase
StudentStudents, teachers, and educational institutions2,0001,000,000Stable
Federal AgencyFederal Agencies80200Increase
 
NameDescription
 
• Integrate historic resources as a viable part of the environment for communities, organizations, and agencies at all levels well into the future
Summary and Alignment

Identifying, evaluating and protecting historic resources supports broad priorities in economic development, tourism, education, conservation, response to climate change and emergency preparedness. Historic resources are tangible assets that form the basis for a $21.2 billion tourism industry and that stimulates billions of dollars into the economy through rehabilitation of older buildings in urban cores creating thousands of jobs as well as homes for families and businesses alike. Historic places provide the authetic experience to educate our children and enhance the quality of life in communities all across the Commonwealth. Reusing historic buildings reduces waste and energy consumption and encourages reuse of urban centers providing homes for families and businesses alike not only providing homes for families and commercial enterprises, but also strengthening our efforts to protect and renew the environment. Virginia is blessed with a rich and varied collection of historic resources ranging from archaeological sites that tell the story of Native American’s living here over 16,000 years ago, to the settlement of Jamestown, frontier expansion and the struggle to create a new nation, industrial revolution and Civil War, to places associated with the Cold War and space exploration that give our communities a unique character and that draw visitors from around the nation and the world. Department of Historic Resource programs support a wide range of public and private efforts to make the most of irreplaceable historic resources that can and should benefit Virginia communities for generations to come.

Associated State Goal
Natural Resources: Protect, conserve and wisely develop our natural, historical and cultural resources.
Associated Societal Indicator
Historic Resources
Objectives
» Increase the protection and/or rehabilitation and reuse of historic properties for economic and community benefits.
Description

This objective represents the agency's commitment to strengthen the preservation of historic assets that both tell the story of Virginia and bring tourists and businesses to Virginia communities. It supports reuse of older buildings, revitalization of urban cores, and quality of life and in doing so supports broader prioritieis such as economic development and a strong business climate, creative and authentic educational tools, transportation initiatives, government that is responsive to community needs, and emergency and climate change preparedness.


Objective Strategies
• Acquire and manage historic preservation and open space easements to protect important historic assets

• Provide technical guidance to enhance consideration, protection, and use of historic assets affected by state and federal projects, funding, licensing, and permits

• Guide private rehabilitation projects to ensure they qualify for tax credits--thus both stimulating the economy and providing homes for families and businesses

• Conduct studies and other projects that both prepare for and respond to the effects of climate change

» Increase the number of historic resources identified, evaluated and registered
Description

This objective ensures that public and private decisionmakers have reliable, up-to-date information on the location, nature, and relative significance of historic buildings, sites, objects, structures, and districts throughout the Commonwealth.  Objective supports economic development and tourism, transportation and other public project planning, community revitalization and reuse of existing infrastructure, emergency preparedness and response particularly in the face of extreme weather conditions, earthquake, and climate change. It encompasses both the identificaion of historic resources, and their inclusion in a system that is readily accessible to decisionmakers, and the public recognition of those resources that meet the criteria for historic, architectural, or archaeological significance through listing on the Virginia Landmarks Register.


Objective Strategies
• Evaluate significance of historic properties.

• Manage public notifications, public meetings, board review, and board meetings to support registration.

• Partner with local governments, universitites, and other organizations to conduct historic resource surveys.

• Provide guidance and technical assistance to localities, property owners, and community organizations to complete the research and analysis and guide them through the registration process.

• Review and provide quality control for federal and other public surveys.

• Focus survey efforts on localities at risk for storm, flood and rising waters associated with climate change.

» Increase knowledge of Virginia’s historic assets and how to use them for greater economic, educational, tourism, and civic benefits
Description

This objective represents the commitment to educate and train citizens, public agencies, developers, local officials, teachers and other stakeholders about historic places (buildings, sites, objects and districts) and about the tools they can use to make the most of these assets to meet economic and other priorities and to increase citizen access to the stories these places have to tell.


Objective Strategies
• Conduct or cosponsor educational activities to students, teachers, families, and the general public about Virginia history, historic places, and the benefits of preservation

• Conduct training for agencies, local governments, property owners, developers, and other target audiences in how to use the programmatic "tools" of preservation for economic and community revitalization

• Provide information and guidance on-line and through publications

» Enhance the accessibility of records documenting historic properties both on-site and on-line while maintaining a high level of care and security
Description
This objective ensures that we manage the historic resources under Department of Historic Resources' control effectively both for long-term preservation and for active use by public and private decisionmakers, researchers, students, property owners, the general public and any other appropriate customer group. The objective is not only about access to public records, but managing those records to ensure that they are available when needed to inform state and federal transportation projects, affordable housing and community development grants, and other publicly funded and licensed projects, transportation projects, for tourism development, to draw film projects to Virginia communities, and to support state, federal, and local emergency and climate change preparations and responses.

Objective Strategies
• Continue enhancements for on-line inventory of historic properties (V-CRIS)

• Continue enhancements to agency geographic information system--digital maps

» Be prepared to act in the interest of the citizens of the Commonwealth and its infrastructure during emergency situations by actively planning and training both as an agency and as individuals.
Description
As Virginia's state historic preservation office, the Department of Historic Resources maintains and provides information about historic resources statewide, as well as expertise in archaeology and historic preservation disciplines, that is vital to the Federal Emergency Management Administration, the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, local governments, historic property owners and other decisionmakers as they respond to emergencies such as fire, flood, wind and other damage to historic buildings and sites. These services are increasingly important as Virginia agencies and communities prepared for and respond to rising waters and more extreme weather conditions associated with climate change. As such, the agency is committed to update and manage that data in a way that it will be ready at a moments notice when needed, to maintain an internal "culture of preparedness" so that core agency services are always available, and to provide information and guidance about how other persons and organizations whose decisions affect historic resources can be prepared as well.

Objective Strategies
• Maintain and update essential information about historic resources both on-site and on-line

• Provide training and on-line reference materials to help others be prepared for emergencies affecting historic resources

• Ensure that key agency staff can continue to provide services even when an emergency affects agency facilties and operations

• Focus survey attention on localities at high risk for recurring damage due to rising waters and climate change

» Improve the maintenance and operation of historic attractions and museums through restoration, rehabilitation, or educational projects
Description
Historic attractions and museums, along with natural areas, provide the foundation for Virginia's multi-billion dollar tourism industry. They link us to our roots, educate children and adults alike, and help provide the quality of life that makes Virginia communities attractive places to live and work. The objective to strengthen these economic and cultural assets helps to ensure that they continue to serve Virginia's communities into the future.

Objective Strategies
• Review and approve all grant reimbursement and payment requests to ensure they are completed in timely manner and in accordance with the law and the purpose for which the grant was awarded.

• Provide technical assistance and the loan of archaeological artifacts to support museum exhibits and education programs.

» Advance state leadership by example in the stewardship of state-owned historic properties
Description

This objective focuses our efforts to assist state agencies that own or control buildings and lands to be better stewards of historic resources under their control. It supports not only economic development and educational priorities, it also promotes sound fiscal stewardship of state-owned historic assets.


Objective Strategies
• Prepare a biennial report due in odd numbered years on the status of state-owned historic properties, their management, threats, and priorities for registration

• Work with property-owning agencies to identify and register historic properties owned by state agencies

• Work with property-owning agencies to improve the treatment and/or consideration of historic resources in the agencies day-to-day operations or projects

» Focus priority attention on historic resources that represent the full range of Virginia's rich and varied history and cultures, and Virginia's rapidly disappearing historically significant battlefields
Description

This objective focuses on an agency initiative to ensure that its programs are inclusive and that we work with a variety of interest groups to list on the Virginia Landmarks Register, include in the state system of historical highway markers, and include in agency educational efforts historic places that tell the story of all groups that have made Virginia what it is today--including but not limited to Native Americans, African Americans, and women. Recognition of the full range of Virginia's historic peoples and places strengthens our communities at large and promotes tourism and economic development using a broader range of stories and places.


Objective Strategies
• Actively encourage private sponsorship and funding to place historical highway markers that tell the stories of Virginia Indians, African Americans, women and other groups that are less well represented in Virginia's historical highway marker system.

• Actively encourage registration of significant historic properties that tell the stories of Virginia Indians, African Americans, women and other groups less well represented in the total number of properties honored through listing on the Virginia Landmarks Register.

• Administer a program of grants competitively awarded to non-profit organizations for the specific purpose of purchasing significant battlefield lands or interests in those lands, donating a perpetual easement to the Commonwealth and managing those lands for long-term conservation, education, and tourism purposes

• Practice good stewardship, including good care and management and effective use of the information, records, and artifacts that the department holds in trust for the citizens of the Commonwealth
Summary and Alignment

The Department of Historic Resources is the steward of a wealth of information about historic resources and the Commonwealth’s primary archaeological collections. It is our responsibility to the citizens of the Commonwealth to increase and manage both information and artifact collections effectively and to encourage their use in planning and decisions that will shape the future of historic buildings, sites, and other historic resources as outlined in the department's goal to integrate historic resources into broader planning and development activities and that will be used to educate our children and our citizens as outlined in the department's goal that focuses on education in the broader sense.

Associated State Goal
Natural Resources: Protect, conserve and wisely develop our natural, historical and cultural resources.
Associated Societal Indicator
Historic Resources
Objectives
» Enhance the accessibility of records documenting historic properties both on-site and on-line while maintaining a high level of care and security
Description
This objective ensures that we manage the historic resources under Department of Historic Resources' control effectively both for long-term preservation and for active use by public and private decisionmakers, researchers, students, property owners, the general public and any other appropriate customer group. The objective is not only about access to public records, but managing those records to ensure that they are available when needed to inform state and federal transportation projects, affordable housing and community development grants, and other publicly funded and licensed projects, transportation projects, for tourism development, to draw film projects to Virginia communities, and to support state, federal, and local emergency and climate change preparations and responses.

Objective Strategies
• Continue enhancements for on-line inventory of historic properties (V-CRIS)

• Continue enhancements to agency geographic information system--digital maps

» Maximize the care and public benefits of the approximately six million objects curated in the department's archaeological collections
Description

This objective ensures that we manage the historic resources, primarily archaeological artifact collections and records on historic resources, under DHR control effectively both for long-term conservation and for active use by public and private decisionmakers, researchers, students, property owners, the general public and any other appropriate customer group.


Objective Strategies
• Continue to enhance the quality and quantity of data on historic resources in the agency databases and geographic information system

• Encourage use of archaeological collections by researchers and for educational purposes

• Establish standards for management of state archaeological collections; manage DHR collections to meet those standards

• Make historic resource data available to key decisionmakers and researchers online

» Be prepared to act in the interest of the citizens of the Commonwealth and its infrastructure during emergency situations by actively planning and training both as an agency and as individuals.
Description
As Virginia's state historic preservation office, the Department of Historic Resources maintains and provides information about historic resources statewide, as well as expertise in archaeology and historic preservation disciplines, that is vital to the Federal Emergency Management Administration, the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, local governments, historic property owners and other decisionmakers as they respond to emergencies such as fire, flood, wind and other damage to historic buildings and sites. These services are increasingly important as Virginia agencies and communities prepared for and respond to rising waters and more extreme weather conditions associated with climate change. As such, the agency is committed to update and manage that data in a way that it will be ready at a moments notice when needed, to maintain an internal "culture of preparedness" so that core agency services are always available, and to provide information and guidance about how other persons and organizations whose decisions affect historic resources can be prepared as well.

Objective Strategies
• Maintain and update essential information about historic resources both on-site and on-line

• Provide training and on-line reference materials to help others be prepared for emergencies affecting historic resources

• Ensure that key agency staff can continue to provide services even when an emergency affects agency facilties and operations

• Focus survey attention on localities at high risk for recurring damage due to rising waters and climate change

• Increase understanding and knowledge about the value of historic resources in educational and economic success and the tools available to put resources to work
Summary and Alignment

In general people will take better care of the things they know and care about, but all too often it is only when those things -- or places -- are already gone or on the brink of destruction that they realize the importance those things or places had in their lives. It is therefore incumbent on the Department of Historic Resources, as the Commonwealth’s historic preservation agency, to provide educational and training materials and opportunities to inform property owners, public agencies, and the general public about the importance of Virginia’s irreplaceable historic properties, the economic, cultural, and educational benefits of their preservation and use, and the tools that are available to make historic resources and preservation work for Virginia’s communities. This historic resources aspect of environmental education is an essential foundation for the accomplishment of the agency's goals to integrate the preservation of historic resources into public and private activities statewide and the natural outcome of the information and archaeological collections managed as part of the agency's stewardship for records and objects in its care.

Associated State Goal
Natural Resources: Protect, conserve and wisely develop our natural, historical and cultural resources.
Associated Societal Indicator
Historic Resources
Objectives
» Increase knowledge of Virginia’s historic assets and how to use them for greater economic, educational, tourism, and civic benefits
Description

This objective represents the commitment to educate and train citizens, public agencies, developers, local officials, teachers and other stakeholders about historic places (buildings, sites, objects and districts) and about the tools they can use to make the most of these assets to meet economic and other priorities and to increase citizen access to the stories these places have to tell.


Objective Strategies
• Conduct or cosponsor educational activities to students, teachers, families, and the general public about Virginia history, historic places, and the benefits of preservation

• Conduct training for agencies, local governments, property owners, developers, and other target audiences in how to use the programmatic "tools" of preservation for economic and community revitalization

• Provide information and guidance on-line and through publications

» Maximize the care and public benefits of the approximately six million objects curated in the department's archaeological collections
Description

This objective ensures that we manage the historic resources, primarily archaeological artifact collections and records on historic resources, under DHR control effectively both for long-term conservation and for active use by public and private decisionmakers, researchers, students, property owners, the general public and any other appropriate customer group.


Objective Strategies
• Continue to enhance the quality and quantity of data on historic resources in the agency databases and geographic information system

• Encourage use of archaeological collections by researchers and for educational purposes

• Establish standards for management of state archaeological collections; manage DHR collections to meet those standards

• Make historic resource data available to key decisionmakers and researchers online

» Focus priority attention on historic resources that represent the full range of Virginia's rich and varied history and cultures, and Virginia's rapidly disappearing historically significant battlefields
Description

This objective focuses on an agency initiative to ensure that its programs are inclusive and that we work with a variety of interest groups to list on the Virginia Landmarks Register, include in the state system of historical highway markers, and include in agency educational efforts historic places that tell the story of all groups that have made Virginia what it is today--including but not limited to Native Americans, African Americans, and women. Recognition of the full range of Virginia's historic peoples and places strengthens our communities at large and promotes tourism and economic development using a broader range of stories and places.


Objective Strategies
• Actively encourage private sponsorship and funding to place historical highway markers that tell the stories of Virginia Indians, African Americans, women and other groups that are less well represented in Virginia's historical highway marker system.

• Actively encourage registration of significant historic properties that tell the stories of Virginia Indians, African Americans, women and other groups less well represented in the total number of properties honored through listing on the Virginia Landmarks Register.

• Administer a program of grants competitively awarded to non-profit organizations for the specific purpose of purchasing significant battlefield lands or interests in those lands, donating a perpetual easement to the Commonwealth and managing those lands for long-term conservation, education, and tourism purposes

» Improve the maintenance and operation of historic attractions and museums through restoration, rehabilitation, or educational projects
Description
Historic attractions and museums, along with natural areas, provide the foundation for Virginia's multi-billion dollar tourism industry. They link us to our roots, educate children and adults alike, and help provide the quality of life that makes Virginia communities attractive places to live and work. The objective to strengthen these economic and cultural assets helps to ensure that they continue to serve Virginia's communities into the future.

Objective Strategies
• Review and approve all grant reimbursement and payment requests to ensure they are completed in timely manner and in accordance with the law and the purpose for which the grant was awarded.

• Provide technical assistance and the loan of archaeological artifacts to support museum exhibits and education programs.

» Increase the number of historic resources identified, evaluated and registered
Description

This objective ensures that public and private decisionmakers have reliable, up-to-date information on the location, nature, and relative significance of historic buildings, sites, objects, structures, and districts throughout the Commonwealth.  Objective supports economic development and tourism, transportation and other public project planning, community revitalization and reuse of existing infrastructure, emergency preparedness and response particularly in the face of extreme weather conditions, earthquake, and climate change. It encompasses both the identificaion of historic resources, and their inclusion in a system that is readily accessible to decisionmakers, and the public recognition of those resources that meet the criteria for historic, architectural, or archaeological significance through listing on the Virginia Landmarks Register.


Objective Strategies
• Evaluate significance of historic properties.

• Manage public notifications, public meetings, board review, and board meetings to support registration.

• Partner with local governments, universitites, and other organizations to conduct historic resource surveys.

• Provide guidance and technical assistance to localities, property owners, and community organizations to complete the research and analysis and guide them through the registration process.

• Review and provide quality control for federal and other public surveys.

• Focus survey efforts on localities at risk for storm, flood and rising waters associated with climate change.

• Provide leadership, resources, expertise, information and tools necessary for effective performance by agency personnel
Summary and Alignment

Providing the level of high quality expertise and effective service needed to address the Department of Historic Resources' mission and goals requires a highly trained and highly motivated staff committed to historic preservation principals and to outstanding customer service. It is the agency's challenge and commitment in turn to hire and retain qualified staff, to encourage life-long professional learning and growth, and to recognize and reward exemplary performance in ways that build and retain a high performance team. It is also the agency's responsibility to administer its human and financial resources to comply with state procurement, accounting, and other administrative procedures consistent with state policy and procedures.

Associated State Goal
Government and Citizens: Be recognized as the best-managed state in the nation.
Objectives
» Be prepared to act in the interest of the citizens of the Commonwealth and its infrastructure during emergency situations by actively planning and training both as an agency and as individuals.
Description
As Virginia's state historic preservation office, the Department of Historic Resources maintains and provides information about historic resources statewide, as well as expertise in archaeology and historic preservation disciplines, that is vital to the Federal Emergency Management Administration, the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, local governments, historic property owners and other decisionmakers as they respond to emergencies such as fire, flood, wind and other damage to historic buildings and sites. These services are increasingly important as Virginia agencies and communities prepared for and respond to rising waters and more extreme weather conditions associated with climate change. As such, the agency is committed to update and manage that data in a way that it will be ready at a moments notice when needed, to maintain an internal "culture of preparedness" so that core agency services are always available, and to provide information and guidance about how other persons and organizations whose decisions affect historic resources can be prepared as well.

Objective Strategies
• Maintain and update essential information about historic resources both on-site and on-line

• Provide training and on-line reference materials to help others be prepared for emergencies affecting historic resources

• Ensure that key agency staff can continue to provide services even when an emergency affects agency facilties and operations

• Focus survey attention on localities at high risk for recurring damage due to rising waters and climate change

» Maintain and/or increase Small, Woman and Minority (SWaM) spend goals.
Description

To maintain and/or increase our Small, Woman and Minority (SWaM) spend goals. DHR has set forth a goal of spending 60% of all qualifying discretionary spend transactions with a SWaM vendor. The Commonwealth goal is currently set at 40%. To ensure the 60% target is acheived DHR will review the spend percentages quarterly to see what percent of the goal has been completed. If 30% has been spent in the first quarter then the agency would be 50% of the way toward achieving it's overall goal of 60%.


Objective Strategies
• Periodically review and actively seek out SWAM vendors for discretionary agency purchases.

• Periodically review SWAM reporting data to ensure that the agency targets are being met.

 

Agency products and services are a closely interwoven and inter-dependent set of tools used to identify, evaluate, and recognize historic resources.  Other programs guide and support a wide variety of stakeholders as they ensure that that Virginia's rich historic heritage continues to play a role in building an economically and environmentally strong future for the Commonwealth, its citizens, and its communities. The agency’s most widely visible services include:

  • Surveys to identify and share information on a growing inventory of more than 225,000 historic buildings, sites, districts, objects and structures

  • Register and historic highway markers to recognize significant historic places and bring them to public attention

  • Review and technical assistance to private projects that rehabilitate and reuse historic buildings to ensure they meet the standards to qualify for tax credits

  • Easements to protect significant buildings and sites in a public/private partnership

  • Environmental review and technical assistance to all federally funded, permitted or licensed projects that may affect significant historic resources

  • Grants to preserve historically significant battlefield lands and the graves of Confederate and Revolutionary War soldiers

  • A federally mandated program to certify and provide grants to local government preservation programs

  • Archaeological field research to document sites, especially those that are threatened with destruction, and to bring the lessons learned from those sites to the public through research reports and through diligent management and stewardship of the state’s collection of several million artifacts

  • Emergency response guidance and assistance to property owners, localities and the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Virginia Department of Emergency Management when historic places are impacted

  • Education and technical assistance to help the public and private property owners understand and preserve historic places in a 21st century world

 

Just as historic places provide the foundation for Virginia's $21.5 billion tourism industry and the nearly $4 million film industry, adaptive reuse of historic buildings using rehabilitation tax incentives has proven to be the single most effective tool in successful urban revitalization. A 2014 report on the economic benefits of historic preservation by Virginia Commonwealth University documents the long-term economic impact and performance of one of the Department of Historic Resources’ most critical program services—technical assistance and certification of private historic rehabilitation projects that qualify for state and/or federal tax credits.  As noted in a press release from Preservation Virginia, “During the 17-year period [covered by the study], nearly $1 billion in tax credits leveraged almost $3 billion in private investment, resulting in the rehabilitation of 2,375 buildings—ranging from warehouses, hotels, theaters and even part of a prison complex to private residences. Expenses of $3.97 billion for these rehabilitation projects serves as a catalyst on sectors of the economy to stimulate an additional estimated $3.9 billion in activity, adding to the state’s overall economic well being, according to the study”—producing reliable investments even through the Great Recession of 2007-2009.  Annual performance for the Department of Historic Resources is summarized in the bullets and table below, As of January 2015 those figure had grown to more than $4 billion in private investment.

Highlighted outcomes of other agency programs and services include:

  • During state fiscal year 2014, DHR worked with developers to bring 153 rehabilitation projects to successful completion for a total of $223.25 million in private investment.
  • DHR archives served 4,861 researchers either on site or through its research services.
  • Sponsored or cosponsored training and educational activities reached 18,409 adults and students through workshops, field schools, lectures, and other educational activities ranging from Archaeological Resource Kits used in school classrooms to major conferences and training in cemetery preservation and state and federal review processes.
  • Exhibits using Department archaeological artifacts around the state reached an audience totaling approximately 635,483 people of all ages.
  • Partnerships primarily with localities and other public agencies added records on an additional 3,520 historic properties to the statewide inventory – which now totals more than 225,000 buildings, districts, sites, structures, and objects.
  • Property owners and staff reached agreements to place an additional 20 historic properties under perpetual easement and staff visited more than 30% of the total easement properties to ensure compliance with existing easements.
  • Agency performance in reviewing publicly funded or permitted projects within 30 days reached a new high of 95%.
  • Fully 64% of all historical highway markers approved for placement on Virginia’s roads and byways told the story of people and cultures generally under-represented in the telling of Virginia history, while 20% of all properties added to the Virginia Landmarks Register reflected Virginia’s rich diversity, and educational programs and exhibits reflecting this diversity account for 23% of the agency’s public audience.
 
Authorized Maximum Employment Level (MEL)          45
Salaried Employees40
Wage Employees          2
Contracted Employees          11
 

Changing Demographic Pressures on Historic Resources:  There are several population and related trends that strongly impact historic assets in communities throughout Virginia.

  1. A movement out of suburbs and back into city cores provides both an opportunity to rehabilitate urban residential neighborhoods and adaptively reuse older commercial and industrial buildings (as has been done with great success in Richmond, Roanoke and Arlington for example), but can also pose threat if less visionary development leads to large-scale demolition of historic assets.
  2. Growing transportation and energy needs put pressure on historic communities, landscapes, and archaeological sites with new roads, widening of existing roads, and the construction of major power lines to support a growing digital economy. Such large projects often need detailed studies and must balance competing social and economic priorities. Impacts to historic resources are best considered early in the planning process to avoid or minimize unexpected consequences and potentially damaging conflict.
  3. Deterioration of rural and agricultural resources when people and industry move away from communities (particularly in Southside and Southwest Virginia) can be nearly as damaging to historic places as rapid development—including the trend of clearing land for industrial parks in the hopes that someone will come to the region to use those cleared areas in the future.

 

Climate Change/Rising Sea Level/Catastrophic Storm Surges: From prehistoric and colonial archaeological sites to Historic Jamestowne, Tangier Island, and Fort Monroe, virtually all historic resources in Virginia’s Atlantic and Chesapeake coastal areas are increasingly impacted by changing weather patterns and rising waters.  Regardless of the causes, increased flooding, changing shorelines, and potential loss of historic fabric in hundreds of coastal communities is a reality that needs careful and meaningful study, preparation and responses.    

 

Revenues: The future of federal funds is unclear and has been flat at best for more than a decade. The federal transportation enhancement fund program (administered by the Virginia Department of Transportation) has changed and will no longer fund the historic highway marker program increasing reliance on general funds and reduction in the number of priority markers developed and placed. Special fund revenues have been steadily declining across the board. As of 2014 the agency is in the process of promulgating regulatory revisions that will help close the gap between demand for rehabilitation project assistance and certification and the staffing needed to provide those services which are funded entirely through review fees.

 

IT Costs and Demands: While the agency’s greatest IT risk was once the rising cost of basic services, the larger issues are now the need to expand the agency IT portfolio and the ongoing costs of electronic storage space. Having completed overhauling the agency’s online historic resources inventory and developing the nation’s first on-line project review/data-sharing system, the agency needs both to maintain and to continue enhancing these systems. Further, new systems need to be developed to integrate related program records and management. Paper records on nearly 600 easements, hundreds of rehabilitation projects, and thousands of publically-funded or licensed projects, and over 225,000 historic places need to be digitized.  As DHR’s digital data store increases, so does the ongoing cost of storage. Finally, a once-award-winning website is now outdated and in need of transformation with both short term development costs and long term maintenance requirements beyond the current capacity.

 

Leases: DHR has traditionally negotiated leases for satellite offices at little or no cost to the agency. Host localities and organizations can no longer afford to provide free space, particularly space that meets state leasing requirements.  A new lease for the Tidewater office is currently in negotiation and the lease for the agency’s main office in Richmond will need to be renewed by 2018.

 

Workforce Capacity and Continuity: Primary factors affecting the work force are the high volume of demand and complexity of the work, changing nature of historic preservation services, and the market competition from other agencies and the private sector. In addition, the impact of staff retirements is being felt in several areas.  Fully 7% of DHR staff have retired in the past biennium. Two of these positions were abolished as cost savings.  Another 13% of the agency staff will become eligible for retirement during the coming biennium.

 

 
General Information About Ongoing Status of Agency

The Department of Historic Resources (DHR) is a lean, dynamic, service-oriented agency.  A small agency with many complex programs, DHR faces high expectations for performance both internally and externally. As a result of the impact of the broader economic situation on both DHR and its stakeholders, the agency has strategically focused more and more on the most essential aspects of highly interconnected core programs and services, including greater emphasis on training to help stakeholders help themselves.

In this light, agency priorities include:
• Emphasizing core programs and services including environmental review, rehabilitation tax credits, registration, historic resource data management and easement management. Other mandated services that will be reduced due to limited resources include survey, training and educational efforts, and general technical assistance.

• Conducting studies and projects that support both preparedness for and responses to rising sea level and extreme weather conditions associated with ongoing climate change.
• Encouraging good stewardship of historic resources in both the public and private sectors;
• Educating customers on the benefits of historic preservation and the tools that they can use to meet their own goals more effectively;
• Finding and retaining qualified, knowledgeable, and customer-oriented employees;
• Providing timely and responsive service in all service areas;
• Using technology to enhance transparency, efficiency, and both accurate and timely data management and delivery.

DHR remains committed to ongoing initiatives:
• State Stewardship including helping state agencies become better stewards of lands and buildings;
• Sustainability including emphasizing historic resources’ role in an environmentally sensitive and economically dynamic future;
• Inclusiveness including ensuring programs are both accessible to and representative of the full range of stakeholders and cultural and ethnic influences in Virginia history.

Information Technology

The Department of Historic Resources (DHR) has long embraced, and is a national leader in, Information Technology solutions to manage and deliver historic resource data to public and private customers--contributing to a wide range of economic, tourism, infrastructure, conservation and education goals. Each year, customers demand and internal users need more and better data, tools, analysis and greater interactivity, as well as faster delivery.

 For example:

  • A surge in federally funded projects prompted DHR to develop the nation’s first electronic project information exchange (ePIX) for review applicants to submit data and for both applicants and reviewers to track the process electronically.
  • Partnering with Dominion Virginia Power and the Tusculum Institute, DHR created an interactive website that provides home owners with valuable information to address energy efficiency in a cost effective manner and delivered that message to all Dominion's residential customers.
  • More recently DHR established a Facebook site as part of its citizen engagement strategy to help reach a younger, more diverse audience.
  • As part of a website hosting move, DHR upgraded its highway marker application to allow staff greater access to a single database.  Highway marker data, including coordinates, can be downloaded on demand by external users and a map service is available for use in external applications.
  • In order to address external user expectations for multi-browser capability, centralized tracking on project status and increased security, DHR overhauled its nationally recognized online system with data on more than 225,000 historic resources (the Virginia Cultural Resource Information System or V-CRIS). 

As we move into the next biennium, DHR will focus on the next steps down to ensure Virginia has a 21st century approach to historic preservation data:

  • In order to meet growing demand for readily accessible digital data, DHR will focus over the next two biennia on continuing to enhance this system, update and digitize hundreds of thousands of paper records, and build systems that integrate V-CRIS and ePIX as well as the management of listing properties on the Virginia Landmarks Register, managing preservation grants, easements and rehabilitation tax credit projects into a single inter-connected system.
  • A once award-winning web site no longer meets user needs. Transitioning to a content management system would streamline business processes, and offer a website that is more interactive, easier to navigate and takes less technical expertise to maintain.
  • Advances in technology and greater customer (and internal) demands for more and better geospatial data require DHR to expand the existing geographic information system to allow for a higher level of interaction, such as providing dynamic data access and greater ability for customized self service through a public map viewer.  In addition, the demand for accurate survey data would be enhanced by the use of geographic positioning systems.
Estimate of Technology Funding Needs
Workforce Development

The Department of Historic Resources (DHR) takes a strategic approach to changing resources, staffing levels, customer needs, and simply changes of doing business in the field of historic preservation. The agency has reorganized to minimize the effects of staff reductions and retirements over the years and redefined positions to address the growing need for skills such as geographic mapping systems. The agency has trained existing staff to improve web site development and maintenance, and recognizes gaps in history (particularly Civil War, Native American, and African American history) as a result primarily of retirements. As the tax credit and easement programs grow in both numbers and complexity, there is increasing demand for historic architectural specialists and legal expertise in order to minimize the risk in these two high impact programs. The trends toward retirements (particularly at the senior level), growing program/legal complexity, and need for different skill sets are expected to continue for the foreseeable future.

Physical Plant

The Department of Historic Resources (DHR) fills its statewide responsibilities by services provided from a central facility in Richmond, supplemented by regional offices in Newport News, Salem, and Stephens City.  (Central and Southside regional services are provided from Richmond.) The agency also has a one-person satellite in Harrisonburg. Administrative services staff are housed in Petersburg. From the inception of its regional office system in 1989, DHR has located its remote offices by allowing localities to compete to house DHR staff and services at little or no cost to the agency. Over the years, with changes in the economic climate for its local hosts and state leasing requirements, local hosts have been reluctant to renew those leases making it more difficult to keep the regional offices in the same areas. Each of the three have now been moved at least once. In the coming years, DHR will explore options to co-locate with both public and private agencies in a continuing effort to keep costs low and to retain its ability to provide services more quickly and cost-effectively to localities than could be provided from a single office in Richmond. The central office in Richmond is co-located through a lease with the Virginia Historical Society--in space designed and built with private funds specifically to meet DHR programs, archives, and artifact collections and conservation needs. That 20-year lease will be up for renewal by 2018.

 
TitleFile Type
 

Administration of Grants for Cultural and Artistic Affairs [14307]

In years when the General Assembly appropriates funds for grants to non-state entities, DHR contacts non state agencies, receives grant applications, answers questions regarding applicable regulations, assists with Electronic Data Interchange enrollment, reviews grants for adequate supporting documentation, provides match documents to the Secretary of Finance for certification, prepares budget transactions, monitors appropriation levels, and processes payments to grantees.

There is no Administrative funding for this service area. Administrative Services (59900) provides the support.

 

This service area aligns itself to the agency mission by providing administrative support for processing non state agency grants that support the Commonwealth's cultural resources.

 
Description of Major Products and Services
Grant funds are disbursed to non state agencies in accordance with law.
Anticipated Changes

Grants are appropriated by the General Assembly. Any changes to the services (grant payment process) will be made as changes are made to the law. No new grants to non-state entities have been funded by the General Assembly for the past several years.

Factors Impacting

Products and services are impacted by the number, and funding level of grants appropriated by the General Assembly as well as the administrative capacity and compliance of the grant recipients with conditions of receiving state funds. Non compliance with any of these factors can impact the payment and timing of these grants. In addition, grant payments must be administered along with the full workload by Administrative Services (59900). The timing of the payment can be affected by other priorities and deadlines mandated for the Administrative Services unit and the agency at large.

 

In fiscal years 2006 and 2007, nonstate agency grants of $29,619,749 and $36,714,770 were awarded in Chapters 951 and 847 of the Appropriation Act, respectively. These amounts were awarded to agency 986 and subsequently transferred to the Department to this service area (financial assistance for administration of grants for Cultural and Artistic Affairs-14307). These funds are not included in the Department's appropriation. Out of the SFY2007 funding in 14307, $5,822,000 was transferred to the Department's Financial Assistance for Historic Preservation (50204) service area to award and administer grants under § 10.1-2213, Code of Virginia. These grants can fluctuate from year to year as they are awarded by the General Assembly. For SFY2008, $26,713,850 was awarded to State Grants to Nonstate Entities, with $4,560,250 of that amount transferred for historic grants.

No grants were awarded in SFY2009 - SFY2015.

Biennial Budget
2015
General Fund
2015
Nongeneral Fund
2016
General Fund
2016
Nongeneral Fund
Initial Appropriation for the Biennium0000
Changes to Initial Appropriation0000
 
TitleFile Type
 

Financial Assistance for Historic Preservation [50204]

The Governor and the General Assembly authorize matching grants to museums and historic sites through the annual General Appropriation Act for the rehabilitation and restoration of historic properties that are open to the public and that provide a combination of educational, cultural, and tourism benefits to the surrounding community. Some grants are also available for educational programs that use these historic places to interpret Virginia history. Appropriations are also made for grant programs that support battlefield preservation, maintenance and restoration of the graves of Revolutionary War Veterans and Confederate veterans.

Payments for maintenance of Revolutionary and Confederate veterans' graves are determined by a formula and administered by the Department of Historic Resources (DHR) through contracts with the Sons of the American Revolution and the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

Matching grants to preserve historically significant battlefields are awarded to specific projects through a competitive process. Requirements include, among other criteria and conditions, donation of easements to be held in perpetuity by the Commonwealth on the properties preserved using state grant funds.

DHR’s administration of the grants for rehabilitation and restoration ensures that the historic properties being funded receive appropriate treatment consistent with accepted preservation standards. Prior to disbursement of funds for rehabilitation or restoration work at historic properties, DHR reviews work and provides extensive technical assistance and guidance for how work should be done to conform to historic preservation standards to ensure adequate and appropriate treatment for historic resources. Grant administration also requires that DHR contact grant recipients, receive and review grant applications, answer questions regarding grant requirements and regulations, review requests for disbursement for adequate supporting documentation and eligibility of expenditures, and process payments to grant recipients. Requirements to receive these grants also require donation of an easement on properties which receive $50,000 or more in state funds over a 5 year period.

 

Grants administered through this service area are in direct alignment with DHR’s mission to put Virginia's history to work. Many of the "bricks-and-mortar" preservation grants restore or rehabilitate historic buildings used by the public (county courthouses or other public buildings, etc.) or open to the public as part of museum or historic site offerings. Virginia Battlefield Preservation Grants ensure the long-term conservation of battlefield lands and lead to their interpretation for the public benefit.  DHR’s administration of these grants supports appropriate care and treatment of the Commonwealth’s historic resources for public benefit.

 
Description of Major Products and Services

Grants to Historic Attractions—Funds approved by the General Assembly for restoration projects on historic properties owned by non-profit organizations for educational purposes. These projects are generally “bricks-and-mortar” restoration or for educational programming interpreting historic attractions under §10.1-2212 and §10.1-2213. Numbers and complexity of these projects vary greatly from year to year. Many are funded once but represent multi-year projects that must be monitored and tracked frequently. (Not funded since 2009)

Grants to Confederate Graves and Monuments—Funds appropriated by the General Assembly to maintain Confederate graves and monuments under §10.1-2211.

Grants to Revolutionary War Veterans Graves and Monuments—Funds appropriated by the General Assembly to maintain Revolutionary War Veterans graves and monuments under §10.1-2211.1

Grants to non-profit organizations to preserve historically significant battlefield lands under §10.1-2202.4.

Anticipated Changes

Changes to this area would occur from increases or decreases to grants awarded by the General Assembly or Code of Virginia or other statutory changes.

Factors Impacting

General Assembly funding for historic preservation grants
• Additions to list of known Confederate/Revolutionary War veterans graves—with associated funding
• Availability of partner organizations United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC) and Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) to manage grants
• Administrative and financial capacity of grant recipients

 

This service area supports several grants specifically identified as:  Grants for maintaining Confederate and Revolutionary War Graves; the Virginia Battlefield Preservation Fund for conservation of historically significant battlefield lands, and reimbursement of restoration expenses for Montpelier, the historic home of President James Madison.  When the General Assembly funds historic preservation grants in general, they are accounted for in this program area.

Biennial Budget
2015
General Fund
2015
Nongeneral Fund
2016
General Fund
2016
Nongeneral Fund
Initial Appropriation for the Biennium1,544,637499,5571,544,679499,660
Changes to Initial Appropriation001,100,0000
 
TitleFile Type
 

Historic Resource Management [50205]

Historic resource management implements the Department of Historic Resources' (DHR) federal role as Virginia's State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) as well as its state mandates to encourage, stimulate, and support the identification, evaluation, protection, preservation, and rehabilitation of the Commonwealth's significant historic, architectural, archaeological, and cultural resources; to establish and maintain a permanent record of those resources; and to foster a greater appreciation of these resources among the citizens of the Commonwealth. Core services include collecting, maintaining and providing information on historic resources; recognition and technical support for those resources and their owners; encouraging public and private protection and use of historic resources for economic development, community revitalization and education; and statewide educational programs for different customer groups. Since most public and virtually all private heritage stewardship efforts are voluntary, DHR’s role in educating, informing and advising the public, community and economic leaders and citizens of the next generation about the public benefits of heritage stewardship is the most important aspect of its programs and mission.

 

Historic resource management lies at the core of DHR's mission to put Virginia's history to work through the identification, recognition, and preservation of the Commonwealth's significant historic, architectural, archaeological, and cultural resources for the use and enjoyment of our citizens and communities.

 
Description of Major Products and Services

Archaeology—promoting and supporting identification, preservation, documentation, and interpretation of Virginia’s fragile archaeological resources. May include archaeological survey, excavation, analysis, and report writing, prioritizing and funding archaeological studies of sites threatened with destruction, and technical advice and assistance to public and private property owners.

Archaeological Curation and Conservation—managing the state’s archaeological collections and making them accessible for research and educational purposes statewide. Includes cataloguing, conserving, processing and monitoring loans, creating exhibits, conducting lectures and workshops, establishing standards and guidelines for curation and conservation, and providing expert technical assistance to museums, public agencies, and other holders of archaeological collections, as well as researchers using our collections.

Technical Assistance—advice, guidance, on-site meetings and inspections, and other activities designed to help all customer groups meet a wide range of preservation objectives and to guide them through the relevant state and federal review processes. Such assistance is an integral part of all other agency services.

Comprehensive Preservation Planning—Developing and implementing a statewide historic preservation plan, as well as providing information and technical assistance to support historic resources sections of local comprehensive plans

Certified Local Governments—a federal program of grants, services, and guidance to support local governments in their historic preservation planning, education, and compliance efforts. Includes grant selection, project monitoring, and technical assistance for projects, guidance for local governments developing ordinances, design guidelines, and historic preservation plans.

Survey & Inventory—identifying historic resources and making that information available for planning and decisions. Includes project selection management to conducts surveys of localities to identify historic properties, quality control for consultant’s products, data-review, entry and analysis, managing archival and electronic records on over 225,000 historic properties and districts, retrieving and analyzing data for public agency and private planning.

Register –evaluating the significance of historic resources and listing them on the Virginia Historic Landmarks Register and the National Register of Historic Places. Listing provides official recognition for such properties but places no restrictions on private property owners. Listing is required for access to public incentives such as tax credits and grants. Involves extensive technical assistance and/or research, analysis, report writing, technical review at several stages in the process, managing public meetings, board meetings, editing, and working with property owners, community groups, local governments, and the general public.

Rehabilitation Tax Incentives—services to property owners, developers and localities to ensure that projects seeking state and federal rehabilitation tax credits meet appropriate historic preservation standards. Requires extensive and complicated property and project plan review, analysis and negotiation, working with and training developers and property owners..

Historic Preservation Easements—services to property owners to accept and manage rights and responsibilities donated on historic properties. Includes property review and analysis, negotiation with owners, legal interpretation, property monitoring, project analysis and review, reporting to the board.

Review and Compliance—advisory review services to state, federal, and local agencies to help them meet their state and federal mandated responsibilities to identify and consider the effect of public actions on historic properties. This area also includes issuing permits for archaeological removal of human remains and participation in permits issued by the Virginia Marine Resources Commission for recovery of historic artifacts from Virginia’s rivers and streams and by the Department of Conservation and Recreation for removal of human remains or artifacts from caves. High volume and highly technical review, often multiple reviews for complex projects, training and working closely with state, federal, and local agencies, and community groups as consulting parties, and with the federal Advisory Council on Historic Preservation.

Education and Outreach—informing and educating all customer categories about historic resources, historic preservation tools, and the benefits of historic preservation for citizens and communities. Involves working with client groups to determine training and education needs, researching and developing range of delivery products, exhibits, lectures, workshops, field schools, publications, web features based on variety of history and preservation topics to meet the needs of particular target audiences.

Historical Highway Markers—coordinating processes to gain Historic Resources Board approval and Virginia Department of Transportation placement of appropriate historical highway markers along Virginia’s roadways. Involves research, writing, interpretation, working with marker sponsors, board members and various interested parties.

Historic Preservation Grants--managing targeted grant programs to protect historically significant battlefield lands and to maintain the graves of Confederate and Revolutionary War veterans as well as grants supporting preservation and interpretation of historic buildings and sites when these are appropriated by the General Assembly or when federal grant funds are available.

Anticipated Changes

The nature of the Department of Historic Resources' (DHR) products and services is expected to remain constant. The demand for DHR service is expected to increase requiring a combination of greater efficiency, and a continuing shift of direct services to providing training and “self-help” tools.

At the same time that demand continues to rise (and/or to become more complex) funding and staff levels have dropped significantly requiring the agency to rethink its services and service delivery. As a result many of the agency's strategic targets have been reduced for immediately past and current biennium.

DHR continues to shift its efforts to provide written technical briefs, and information about historic resources and preservation from print  to electronic media including greater use of web-based delivery, social media, and electronic versions of agency publications.

There is a growing need to shift from paper to digital records (including hundreds of thousands of slides and photographs along with forms, letters, project reports and more) and information management and to find digital solutions that will integrate programs and services. 

While demand for service delivery at the regional level continues to grow, retirement of key staff and past staff reductions requires that the agency rethink its regional service delivery overall.

Factors Impacting

Increases in customer demand continue to impact DHR services. Some of these impacts include (but are not limited to):
• Changes to state or federal law;
• Changes to state or federal funding and staffing—not only for the agency, but equally important to the agencies customers/stakeholders/partners;
• Slow recovery in the construction industry counterbalanced by the increased importance of rehabilitation tax incentives for jobs and economic recovery;
• Delegation of federal and state responsibilities—usually to agencies without the expertise and experience to handle those responsibilities;
• Office of the Attorney General advisory regarding Constitutional ban on General Assembly appropriations to non-profit organizations—puts additional stress on the capacity for small historic museums and attractions to keep their doors open;
• Changes in information technology and the need to keep up with those changes to keep data and services accessible and current;
• Internal changes to staff expertise as senior employees reach retirement--a trend that has been a factor for several years and will continue through the next biennium--combined with issues of staff retention. The next biennium will require concerted capacity-building efforts to make up for lost expertise and to fill gaps as the needs of the agency change. 

 

This service area consists of 65% general funds and 35% non-general funds.

Biennial Budget
2015
General Fund
2015
Nongeneral Fund
2016
General Fund
2016
Nongeneral Fund
Initial Appropriation for the Biennium2,994,6951,608,6063,004,0341,608,606
Changes to Initial Appropriation-285,0670-370,0040
 
TitleFile Type
 

General Management and Direction [59901]

This service area provides support for the agency to carry out its mission in the following areas: General Agency Management/Leadership, Human Resources, Grants Administration, Procurement, Payroll, Budgeting, Financial Reporting, Accountability, and Information Technology.

 

This service area aligns itself to the agency mission by providing agency employees the leadership and support needed to put history to work through the identification, recognition, and preservation of the Commonwealth’s significant historic, architectural, archaeological, and cultural resources for the use and enjoyment of our citizens and communities.

 
Description of Major Products and Services

Agency Management/Leadership • The agency Director is appointed by the Governor to serve as the Director of the Department of Historic Resources (DHR), a position which is also charged by Code to serve as the State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) for the purposes of carrying out the National Historic Preservation Act of 1996, as amended. The Director provides agency leadership and decision making on all operational and program matters.

Administrative Support • Provides advice on compliance issues • Administers agency fleet • Ensures compliance by creating and testing internal control measures, maintaining policies, conflict of interest data, records retention

Human Resources • Implements an effective workforce plan utilizing accurate and timely workforce data. Attracts and retains qualified workforce by strategically using existing human resource management flexibilities, pay practices and benefits. Plans, develops, implements and manages all recruitment and selection activities. • Administers the agency’s employee performance management program. • Provides opportunities or plans for employee development. • Ensures agency compliance with state and federal directives, such as: Conflict of Interest, Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), Records Retention Management, Equal Employment Opportunities (EEO) and Compensation. • Handles all grievance and compliance activities. • Provides training as needed; and ensures staff is proficient.  Formerly contracted-out to DHRM as a cost-saving measure, HR activities are now back with the agency with no increase in resources.

Grants Administration • National Park Service – Historic Preservation Fund (HPF) Grant • Prepares the annual application, interim reports and year-end report. • Prepares the annual HPF work plan for submission to the National Park Service (NPS) based on input from the senior team. Monitors and reports DHR progress to meet goals. • Monitors grant receipts, expenditures and federal cash to ensure compliance with state and federal guidelines. • Reviews annual application certifying compliance with NPS-49, evaluates funding requests based on established guidelines, establishes/maintains documentation, provides grantee training on fiscal/administrative aspects of the Certified Local Government (CLG) grants, reviews CLG reimbursement requests for compliance with established guidelines, obtains appropriate documentation and approvals before issuing payment. • Ensures salary costs are appropriately charged, maximum allowable reimbursements are promptly collected and grant charges are internally consistent and replicable by state and federal auditors. • Monitors the Cost Share and Threatened Sites fiscal activities. • Provides program interpretation and application ensuring compliance with state requirements. • Documents grant activities and maintains database. • Evaluates annual appropriations and prepares budget entries. • Establishes payment schedule and responds to grantee, agency and legislator inquiries.

Procurement • Manages DHR’s procurement of goods and services, as follows: determines appropriate procurement method for each request, through the review of technical specifications, delivery requirements, availability, and cost; reviews and approves emergency and sole source procurement within established limitations; establishes and monitors term contracts; prepares and issues bid requests; conducts contract negotiations; ensures proper posting and publication of solicitations and awards; schedules and conducts prebid/proposal conferences and determines need for solicitation modifications; presides over sealed bid/proposal openings; evaluates bids/proposals for determination of responsiveness and responsibility; awards purchase orders, contracts and agreements; continually reviews procurement activities to streamline methods and negotiate better prices; prepares written policies and procedures; etc. • Maintains and reviews procurement activities to assess the feasibility of contract development. Establishes and administers term contracts for goods and services using appropriate procurement methods. • Monitors purchase order status, and initiates measures to expedite delivery, as necessary. • Coordinates and maintains agency small charge card program. • Works to increase the number of certified small, women and minority (SWaM) owned businesses located in the Commonwealth. • Tracks progress toward achieving agency SWaM goals.


Payroll • Certifies DHR payroll. Reviews reports and determines appropriate coding changes. Reconciles classified timesheets and leave slips and ensures proper accountability to payments from general, federal or special funds. • Ensures that employees' salaries, benefits, and changes are properly reflected in statewide systems and that checks, w-2’s, and related documents are provided in a timely manner to employees.

Budgeting • Coordinates DHR's budget development process (annual and biennial). Assists managers in preparing, justifying, analyzing and controlling the biennial budget requests and annual operating plan. • Monitors DHR budgets and expenses, prepares forecasts, estimates revenues, allocates resources and projects expenses working with budget managers. Analyzes financial data, existing operations and procedures, management requests, etc. and recommends funding strategies, efficiencies, opportunities, etc. • Enters budget transactions into statewide systems and complies with all mandates from the Department of Planning and Budget • Prepares legislative impact analysis and summarizes financial data, projections, and fluctuation analyses.

Financial Reporting • Prepares agency financial statements, including year-end reconciliation and fluctuation reports required by the Department of Accounts (DOA). • Reconciles non general fund and maintains records for state and federal audit and tracking purposes. • Manages the agency’s 1099 reporting per IRS requirements. • Prepares the quarterly report and on line submission and annual financial schedule to DOA.

Fiscal • Manages the daily accounts payable function ensuring agency compliance with State Comptroller requirements including prompt pay. Ensures all transactions are accurately coded and documented for accountability. • Drafts agency financial policy and procedures to enhance agency operations. • Ensures agency fiscal activities are in compliance with established policy. Reviews processes to look for ways to become more efficient and effective. • Collects and accounts for incoming funds. • Manages agency Fixed Assets, Leases, Inventory, Vehicles, and Insurance.

Accountability • DHR complies with rules and regulations sufficient to be audited annually by the Auditor of Public Accounts, by the Department of Accounts and periodically by the National Park Service.  DHR conducts annual internal control assessments of all fiscal processes.

Information Technology • See separate Information Technology section of Executive Progress Report.

Anticipated Changes

None.

Factors Impacting

Changes to state and/or federal funding and administrative requirements. Availability of staff and expertise.  Reliance on outside contracts for payroll, and similar services.

 

Administrative Services consists of General Agency Management, Human Resources, Procurement, Fiscal, Grants Administration, and Information Technology. 71% of Administrative Services Appropriation is general fund and 29% non-general funds.

Biennial Budget
2015
General Fund
2015
Nongeneral Fund
2016
General Fund
2016
Nongeneral Fund
Initial Appropriation for the Biennium519,010208,635519,940208,635
Changes to Initial Appropriation0000
 
TitleFile Type
 
SP - Run Date: 08/17/2017 11:15:07